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Hemp Products

This section will describe the products and services we offer to support our clients, patients, and manufacturers in an effort to move the industry forward. We have researched the products, we know what is in them and can provide full test results for everything we sell.

We researched the options and went through many companies to get to the products and companies we are proud to carry. We have chosen two of them from the long list, and their product lines compliment each other nicely. These companies stand out among the rest in many areas, but the incredible knowledge of the hemp plant that they both exhibit was a major factor in PSI carrying their lines. We also understand the direction of the companies as a whole, where so many lacked the planning and required knowledge in order to succeed, our choices stand out.  

We sell only 100% legal Hemp products, and know that our selection will make your life more pleasurable and hopefully pain and disease free. Below is an explanation of the difference between what we sell and high THC marijuana and it's derivatives.

Differences Between Industrial Hemp and Cannabis

Industrial hemp is a variety of cannabis sativa that has a long history of use in the United States.

However, since the 1950s it has been lumped into the same category of marijuana, and thus the extremely versatile crop was doomed in the United States. Industrial hemp is technically from the same species of plant that psychoactive marijuana comes from. However, it is from a different variety, or subspecies that contains many important differences. The main differences between industrial hemp and marijuana will be discussed below.

Industrial hemp has low THC levels compared to marijuana specifically cultivated for personal psychoactive use. Whereas marijuana that can be smoked usually contains between five and ten percent THC, industrial hemp contains about one-tenth of that. In order to get a psychoactive effect, one would need to smoke ten or twelve hemp cigarettes over a very short period of time.

The reason for the low THC content in hemp is that most THC is formed in resin glands on the buds and flowers of the female cannabis plant. Industrial hemp is not cultivated to produce buds, and therefore lacks the primary component that forms the marijuana high. Furthermore, industrial hemp has higher concentrations of a chemical called Cannabidiol (CBD) that has a negative effect on THC and lessens its psychoactive effects when smoked in conjunction.

Compared to cannabis sativa indica, cannabis sativa (industrial hemp variety) has a much stronger fiber. This fiber can be used in anything from rope and blankets to paper. Cannabis fiber has a low tensile strength and will break or shred easily, making it a poor fibrous plant when compared to industrial hemp.

Industrial hemp also grows differently than THC-containing cannabis. Hemp is typically grown up, not out, because the focus is not on producing buds but on producing length of stalk. In this way, hemp is a very similar crop to bamboo. The stalk contains the fiber and hard, woody core material that can be used for a variety of purposes, even carpentry. Generally, THC-producing cannabis plants are grown to an average of five feet in height. Industrial hemp on the other hand is grown to a height of ten to fifteen feet before harvest. 

Since industrial hemp is grown so close together and is generally a very narrow, vertical growth crop, any THC-producing cannabis would stick out like a sore thumb. Its wide growth would require a large amount of space to itself in order to get adequate sunlight from beyond the tops of the competing industrial hemp plants.

The two also differ in the areas that they can be effectively grown. THC-producing cannabis must be grown in generally warm and humid environments in order to produce the desired quantity and quality of THC-containing buds. However, since industrial hemp does not contain these buds, and the hardy parts of the plant are the more desired, it can be grown in a wider range of areas. Generally, industrial hemp grows best on fields that provide high yields for corn crops, which includes most of the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States. Furthermore, since industrial hemp can use male plants as well as female plants (since the object is not THC production), higher crop yields can result.


I bet you didn't know...

The federal government subsidized hemp during the Second World War and U.S. farmers grew about a million acres of hemp as part of that program.

Hemp can be grown organically. Only eight, out of about one hundred known pests, cause problems, and hemp is most often grown without herbicides, fungicides or pesticides. Hemp is also a natural weed suppressor due to fast growth of the canopy.

Hemp produces more pulp per acre than timber on a sustainable basis, and can be used for every quality of paper. Hemp paper manufacturing can reduce wastewater contamination. Hemp's low lignin content reduces the need for acids used in pulping, and its creamy color lends itself to environmentally-friendly bleaching instead of harsh chlorine compounds. Less bleaching results in less dioxin and fewer chemical by-products.

Hemp fiber paper resists decomposition, and does not yellow with age when an acid-free process is used. Hemp paper more than 1,500 years old has been found. Hemp paper can also be recycled more times than wood-based paper.

Hemp produces more pulp per acre than timber on a sustainable basis, and can be used for every quality of paper. Hemp paper manufacturing can reduce wastewater contamination. Hemp's low lignin content reduces the need for acids used in pulping, and its creamy color lends itself to environmentally-friendly bleaching instead of harsh chlorine compounds. Less bleaching results in less dioxin and fewer chemical by-products.

Hemp fiberboard produced by Washington State University was found to be twice as strong as wood-based fiberboard. No additional resins are required due to naturally-occurring lignins

Kimberly-Clark (a Fortune 500 company) has a mill in France which produces hemp paper preferred for bibles and cigarette paper because it lasts a long time and doesn’t yellow.

Fabrics made of at least fifty percent hemp block the sun’s harmful UV rays more effectively than other fabrics.

All schoolbooks were made from hemp or flax paper until the 1880s.

It was legal to pay taxes with hemp in America from 1631 until the early 1800s. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and other founding fathers grew hemp. Washington and Jefferson Diaries. Jefferson smuggled hemp seeds from China to France then to America.